Tuesday, November 3, 2015

NPAC meets tomorrow

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, November 4, 2015
7:00-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle Community College
College Center Building, Room CC1161


Guest speaker: Sgt. Sean Whitcomb, SPD Public Information Officer 

Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month and are open to the public.

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Take public safety survey to assist SPD with making neighborhoods safer



Seattle University is administering the citywide Seattle Public Safety Survey. The purpose of the survey is to solicit feedback on public safety and security concerns from those who live and/or work in Seattle. 

 The survey is accessible October 15th through November 30th at publicsafetysurvey.org and is available in Amharic, Chinese, English, Korean, Somali, Spanish and Vietnamese. 

A report on the survey results will be provided to the Seattle Police Department to assist them with making your neighborhood safer and more secure. 

Engage with City Hall at Meadowbrook October 24


Sunday, October 11, 2015

NPAC requests increased funding for additional police officers

The North Precinct Advisory Council sent the following letter to the Seattle City Council regarding police staffing levels and the proposed city budget. Based on their review of crime prevention research, the Washington State Institute for Public Policy found that additional police officers "reduce crime and generate six to seven dollars of benefits per dollar of cost. The finding that policing is effective in reducing crime is consistent with other recent reviews of the national research literature."
  
The North Precinct Advisory Council (NPAC) is composed of representatives from over 40 community groups and business organizations in north Seattle. NPAC is concerned that the current proposed budget for 2016 only plans to add 30 officers to the Seattle Police Department.  NPAC would like to see the budget reflect the need for 150 officers added as a net gain city wide. 


We are happy to see explicitly stated in the proposed budget, “Greater visibility of police officers in Seattle neighborhoods and downtown is a priority for the Mayor and the chief of police, and as a first step, the department is reallocating resources to put more officers on the streets.”

However, adding 30 officers in 2016 and phasing in 100 officers over four years is simply not enough to keep up with the needs of our city.  Communities and SPD can only build a strong and trusting relationship when we are able to interact beyond the crisis situations that prompt 911 calls.  The most effective way to have citizens and officers interact is to have officers out in our community. 

Current staffing levels simply don’t allow for enough officers to be in our neighborhoods on foot and bike patrols on a regular basis.  The Community Police Team is doing great work and more CPT Officers would go a long way in continuing to build a positive relationship with Seattleites. Adding officers would increase police presence and decrease crime in our city.  The money spent in adding officers would be saved as crime decreases city wide.

For these reasons the North Precinct Advisory Council advocates for targeting the addition of 150 new officers to the budget for 2016.

Monday, October 5, 2015

NPAC meets Wednesday

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, October 7, 2015
7:00-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle Community College
College Center Building, Room CC1161

Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month and are open to the public.

Monday, September 7, 2015

North Precinct police respond to 700 crisis calls in 90-day period

A recent Seattle Times article, SPD report: Minimal force used in contacts with mentally ill, highlights the large number of crisis calls police respond to. During the 90-day period, the North Precinct reported responding to 699 crisis calls out of a city total of 2,464. The North Precinct is second only to the West Precinct (reporting 719 crisis calls), which includes downtown, when it comes to responding to crisis calls.

The article echoes a letter the NPAC Social Services Committee sent to King County Councilmember Dembowski this summer requesting additional funding for the Mobile Crisis Team. Following is an excerpt: 

This year, members of the Seattle Police North Precinct Advisory Council (NPAC) formed committees to focus on public safety issues of particular concern to north Seattle residents. We are members of the Social Services Committee and one of our goals is to increase services in north Seattle to address social and health-related problems that police are often called to address. We are particularly interested in increasing mental health services to help police when they receive calls from community members to address crisis issues like suicidality and drug abuse.

We are writing to you today to thank you for your continued support of the Mental Illness and Drug Dependency (MIDD) program and to urge you to increase funding in the next budget for the Crisis Solution’s Center’s Mobile Crisis Team. The expansion of the Mobile Crisis Team’s services would allow police to link more people with needed support.

In a 90-day period, more than 700 north Seattle calls to 911 are deemed crisis calls. Of those calls, more than a quarter are related to suicide. In most cases, people facing these types of crises can be served better by the Mobile Crisis Team instead of police.

Right now, when police call the Mobile Crisis Team, it can take them anywhere from about 30 minutes to four hours to respond to the crisis.  The longer the response time, the more missed opportunities to serve our neighbors in need. To gain more service with faster response times, police need to call the Mobile Crisis Team more often so that their statistics reflect the need. However, if response times are up to four hours, police are less likely to call. This, in turn, means that call data kept by the Mobile Crisis Team may not reflect the true need in the north end. Increased availability of the Mobile Crisis Team would increase use of the program by police and would better serve people in crisis.

Sunday, August 30, 2015

NPAC meets Wednesday, September 2


After a two month summer hiatus, the SPD North Precinct Advisory Council will meet:  
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
7:00 - 8:00 pm 
North Seattle College, Room CC1161, College Center Building. 

The guest speaker will be Lt Stephen Hirjak from SPD's Force Investigation Team who will speak on use of force

All NPAC meetings are open to the public. All are welcome!

Saturday, July 11, 2015

National Night Out August 4

On Tuesday August 4, the City of Seattle will celebrate the 31st Annual Night Out Against Crime. 

To participate in Night Out and to have your street closed for the event, you must officially register your Night Out event with the City of Seattle: http://www.seattle.gov/police/nightout/default.htm.

Night Out is a national crime prevention event to heighten crime prevention awareness, increase neighborhood support in anti-crime efforts, and unite communities. Neighbor participation in Night Out continues to grow every year. In 2014, over 1,400 Night Out events were registered city-wide. It’s fun, it’s free and it’s a great chance to reconnect with neighbors and share information with each other while learning more about crime prevention. Getting together with your neighbors, re-committing to watch out for each other, and reaffirming you will report suspicious activity to police are ways to show you care about your community. You do not need to be in an active Block Watch to hold a Night Out event.

NPAC is not meeting in August.

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

NPAC meets May 6

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, May 6, 2015
7:00-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle Community College
College Center Building, Room CC1161

Guest speakers will address what communities can do about nuisance properties.

Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month and are open to the public.

Saturday, March 28, 2015

NPAC meets April 1

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, April 1, 2015
7:00-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle Community College
College Center Building, Room CC1161

Guest speaker: Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes

Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month and are open to the public.

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

NPAC meets tomorrow

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, March 4, 2015
7:00-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle Community College
College Center Building, Room CC1161

Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month and are open to the public.

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

NPAC meets tomorrow

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, February 4, 2015
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle Community College
Room CC1161

Guest speaker: Captain Dick Reed, 9-1-1 Communications Center

NPAC meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month and are open to the public.

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

NPAC meets Wednesday

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, January 7
7:00 p.m.
North Seattle Community College, Room CC1161
College Center Building, 9600 College Way North

Guest speaker: Sola Plumacher, Seattle Human Services Department

All NPAC meetings are open to the public.