Saturday, December 10, 2016

NPAC to meet January 4

The North Precinct Advisory Council will meet:
Wednesday, January 4, 2017
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle College
Room CC1161, College Center Building 2

In January, guest speakers will be the officers of the North Precinct Community Police Team.

During typical NPAC meetings, the first 30 minutes are for guest speakers. After that, NPAC members hear public safety-related reports from representatives from:
  • Seattle Police Department North Precinct leadership
  • North Precinct Community Police Team
  • North Precinct Crime Prevention Coordinator
  • Seattle City Attorney's Office
  • King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office
  • Washington State Department of Corrections
  • Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board.
NPAC meetings are open to the public and people concerned about public safety are encouraged to attend.

Sunday, November 13, 2016

NPAC meets December 7

The North Precinct Advisory Council will meet:

Wednesday, December 7, 2016
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle College
Room CC1161, College Center Building 2

Instead of a guest speaker, the first part of the meeting will provide an opportunity to socialize, network, and share public safety concerns and ideas for addressing them in 2017. Please bring a snack or beverage to share.

This meeting also marks the end of our 2016 sock drive so bring socks! Socks are donated to the Harborview Pioneer Square Clinic, ROOTS, YouthCare, and Mary's Place.

During typical NPAC meetings, the first 30 minutes are for guest speakers. After that, NPAC members hear public safety-related reports from representatives from:
  • Seattle Police Department North Precinct leadership
  • North Precinct Community Police Team
  • North Precinct Crime Prevention Coordinator
  • Seattle City Attorney's Office
  • King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office
  • Washington State Department of Corrections
  • Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board.
Reports are followed by about 5 minutes of NPAC business and meetings adjourn at 8:30. Community members may connect with representatives from the agencies listed above after the meeting.

In January, guest speakers will be the officers of the North Precinct Community Police Team.

NPAC meetings are open to the public and people concerned about public safety are encouraged to attend.

Sunday, October 30, 2016

NPAC meets Wednesday, November 2

The North Precinct Advisory Council will meet:

Wednesday, November 2, 2016
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle College
Room CC1161, College Center Building 2

Guest speaker: Brad Finegood from the King County Behavioral Health & Recovery Division and the Heroin and Prescription Opiate Addiction Task Force will talk about task force recommendations.

During typical NPAC meetings, the first 30 minutes are for guest speakers. After that, NPAC members hear public safety-related reports from representatives from:
  • Seattle Police Department North Precinct leadership
  • North Precinct Community Police Team
  • North Precinct Crime Prevention Coordinator
  • Seattle City Attorney's Office
  • King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office
  • Washington State Department of Corrections
  • Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board.
Reports are followed by about 5 minutes of NPAC business and meetings adjourn at 8:30. Community members may connect with representatives from the agencies listed above after the meeting.

NPAC meetings are open to the public and people concerned about public safety are encouraged to attend.

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

NPAC meets Wednesday, October 5

The North Precinct Advisory Council will meet:

Wednesday, October 5, 2016
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle College
Room CC1161, College Center Building

Guest speaker: Elliott Bronstein, from the Seattle Office of Civil Rights, will talk about Seattle's Race and Social Justice Initiative and about the Racial Equity Toolkit.

In November, guest speakers will be Brad Finegood and Patricia Sully from the King County Heroin and Prescription Opiate Addiction Task Force who will talk about task force recommendations.

During typical NPAC meetings, the first 30 minutes are for guest speakers. After that, NPAC members hear public safety-related reports from representatives from:
  • Seattle Police Department North Precinct leadership
  • North Precinct Community Police Team
  • North Precinct Crime Prevention Coordinator
  • Seattle City Attorney's Office
  • King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office
  • Washington State Department of Corrections
  • Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board.
Reports are followed by about 5 minutes of NPAC business and meetings adjourn at 8:30. Community members may connect with representatives from the agencies listed above after the meeting.

NPAC meetings are open to the public and people concerned about public safety are encouraged to attend.

Sunday, September 4, 2016

NPAC meets September 7

The North Precinct Advisory Council will meet:

Wednesday, September 7, 2016
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle College
Room CC1161, College Center Building

Guest speaker: Debbie Goetz, Community Panning Coordinator, Office of Emergency Management, who will talk about community emergency hubs.

Future guest speakers are:

October: Seattle Office of Civil Rights (speaker invited) to talk about the Racial Equity Toolkit and how it may be used when planning public safety activities.

November: Brad Finegood and Patricia Sully from the King County Heroin and Prescription Opiate Addiction Task Force to talk about task force recommendations.

December: Networking, socializing, and identifying ongoing and emerging neighborhood public safety concerns.

During typical NPAC meetings, the first 30 minutes are for guest speakers. After that, NPAC members hear public safety-related reports from representatives from:
  • Seattle Police Department North Precinct leadership
  • North Precinct Community Police Team
  • North Precinct Crime Prevention Coordinator
  • Seattle City Attorney's Office
  • King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office
  • Washington State Department of Corrections
  • Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board.
Reports are followed by about 5 minutes of NPAC business and meetings adjourn at 8:30. Community members may connect with representatives from the agencies listed above after the meeting.

NPAC meetings are open to the public and people concerned about public safety are encouraged to attend.

Friday, July 29, 2016

Safe & Healthy Communities Forum discusses law enforcement, homlessness, and addiction

Councilmember Mike O'Brien hosted a Safe & Healthy Communities Public Forum on July 27. The forum may be viewed on the Seattle Channel.

The program started with Seattle Police Assistant Chief Steve Wilske talking about community policing, a model that enables police officers and community members to know each other, allowing police to address specific concerns of neighbors. The SPD Community Police Team (CPT) currently spends the majority of their time working with the homeless population. Chief Wiske noted that while some homelessness is due to economic reasons it's SPD's experience that more often homelessness in Seattle is related to addiction.

With that in mind, the primary goal of SPD officers is to help people dealing with addiction to get the help they need. They have developed relationships with services in the community so they can connect people to them. He stated that SPD has "zero interest in criminalizing homelessness." He noted that 254 people are living in RVs in the north end.

Assistant Chief Wiske also shared that property crime has increased citywide with the largest increases in NE and SW Seattle. When people are arrested by police for property crimes, officers often find that they are drug addicted. Therefore, drug-related services are essential. At the same time, he noted that while we need to address underlying issues like drug addiction, there is still a need to enforce the law around property crimes.

Lisa Dugaard, Director of the Public Defenders Association, spoke about how law enforcement and justice system response to public health-related issues like drug addiction do not fix the problem. She spoke about recent conversations to bridge the real or perceived gap between law enforcement and public health responses and about innovative programs including:
  • LEAD - Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion program that connects people who engage in low level drug-related crimes with community-based interventions instead of jail when appropriate.
  • Crisis response app development - SPD recently was awarded a grant to develop an app that makes crisis response plans for people in crisis immediately available to police.
  • Safe consumption sites for people who will use drugs in public no matter what. The sites allow people who are using drugs in public to do so in a supervised place so that they can connect with other services.
These are just a few strategies for increasing public safety in neighborhoods that aren't necessarily traditionally considered law enforcement approaches.

Alison Eisinger, Executive Director for Seattle King County Coalition on Homelessness, wrapped up the speaker portion of the meeting talking about homelessness in Seattle.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Join a micro-community policing focus group in your neighborhood this summer


This summer, the new North Precinct micro-community policing research assistant, Jessica Chandler, will be conducting focus groups. She is interested in talking to all the micro-communities in the North Precinct area about knowledge of the Micro-Community Policing Plan, interactions with the Seattle Police Department, crime and safety concerns and suggested improvements for each of our unique neighborhoods. The focus groups are semi-structured and typically last one hour. The groups are open to anyone living or working in the specific neighborhoods.

Don’t know to which community you belong? The following website has an MCPP locator map, where you can see the boundaries for the micro-communities throughout the North Precinct:
http://www.seattle.gov/seattle-police-department/mcpp/mcpp-location-map


Here is a list of the focus groups Jessica has scheduled, including what community it is focusing on and when/where the focus group is being held: 


- Bitterlake: Thursday July 28th 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Broadview Public Library Branch (12755 Greenwood Ave. N.)


 - Greenwood: Monday August 1st 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Greenwood Public Library Branch (8016 Greenwood Ave. N.)


 - Phinney Ridge: Thursday August 4th 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Phinney Neighborhood Association-Blue building, room 6 (6532 Phinney Ave. N.)


 - Fremont: Monday August 8th 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Fremont Public Library Branch (731 N. 35th St.)


 - Roosevelt/Ravenna: Tuesday August 9th 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Green Lake Public Library Branch (7364 E. Green Lake Dr. N.)


 - Lake City: Wednesday August 10th 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Lake City Library Branch (12501 28th Ave. N.E.)          
                                  

 - Northgate: Thursday August 11th 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Northgate Public Library Branch (10548 5th Ave. N.E.)    
                             

 - South Ballard: Monday August 15th 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Ballard Public Library Branch (5614 22nd Ave. N.W.)


 - Wallingford: Tuesday August 16th 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Wallingford Community Senior Center’s multi-purpose room (4649 Sunnyside Ave N, #410)


- North Ballard: Thursday August 18th 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Ballard Public Library Branch (5614 22nd Ave. N.W.)


 - Sandpoint: Monday August 22nd 6:00pm-7:00pm at the Northeast Branch (6801 35th Ave. N.E)


 - University District: Tuesday August 23rd 6:00pm-7:00pm at the University Public Library Branch (5009 Roosevelt Way N.E.)


Need more information? Contact Jessica at Jessica.Chandler@seattle.gov. For more information on the Micro-Community Policing Plan visit: http://www.seattle.gov/seattle-police-department/mcpp

Friday, July 1, 2016

NPAC meets July 6

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, July 6, 2016
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle College
Room CC1161, College Center Building

Guest speaker: Eliott Helmbrecht, Move Seattle Levy Outreach & Accountability Manager at the Seattle Department of Transportation, who will talk about safety-related projects funded by the levy.

NPAC meetings are open to the public. All are welcome!

NPAC does not meet in August.

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

NPAC learns about heroin and its impact on Seattle

SPD bike officers saved a man on Sunday from a potentially fatal overdose by using a dose of Naloxone nasal spray. This incident marks the fourth time police have successfully used Naloxone since officers began carrying it in mid-March.  The program was launched in March in response to the heroin crisis in Seattle. “Our officers provide services every day to people struggling with addiction,” said Chief Kathleen O’Toole during the program's launch. “With Naloxone we hope to save more lives."

According to the King County Task Force on Heroin and Prescription Opiate Addiction, "There were 156 heroin-related deaths in King County in 2014, the highest number in 20 years. Substance abuse is one of the root causes of homelessness, and drug overdose is currently the leading causes of death among people who are homeless."

The link between crimes like shoplifting and drug addiction was evident during SPD's recent crackdown on the open air drug market downtown. "Detectives also got a good look at the area’s underground economy in action, as shoplifters sold armloads of stolen goods—like Seahawks jerseys, sunglasses and even bottles of shampoo—to crowds at bus stops and on street corners. Shoplifters took the cash from those sales, detectives say, and went straight to area drugs dealers."

The heroin crisis is showing up in our neighborhoods as discarded used needles in public places. Earlier this year, the NPAC Social Services Committee hosted a needle clean-up training which has since been replicated among other organizations.

That's why Steve Freng, Prevention and Treatment Manager at the Northwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, was invited to speak during the May NPAC meeting. Dr. Freng provided information about heroin trafficking, heroin-related trends in our state, and the link between prescription painkillers and heroin.

Here are a few of Dr. Freng's slides:

Since 2009, heroin-related admissions to drug treatment programs increased significantly in Washington and King County.

Most new heroin users have abused painkillers. It's much cheaper to sustain an addiction to opioids by using heroin than continuing to use prescription pills.

Black tar heroin is much cheaper locally than it is nationally.

Seattle's heroin is largely transported from Mexico up I=5.


Tuesday, May 3, 2016

NPAC meets May 4

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, May 4, 2016
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle College
Room CC1161, College Center Building

Guest Speaker: Steve Freng, Prevention & Treatment Manager, Northwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

All meetings are open to the public. Everyone is welcome!

Saturday, April 30, 2016

Nuisance properties: What neighbors can do

A common problem that neighborhoods face is houses from which drugs are dealt and stolen items are stored and sold. Below is information shared on the Wedgwood Block Watch listserv about what community members did to rid their neighborhood of one of these houses.

April 26, 2016

Hello, Block Watch,

You probably heard -- or heard of -- the SWAT raid on 8248 38th Avenue NE on April 18/19, 2016. (Normally, we wouldn't share house numbers here, but if you were around that night, you would have heard the address several times on the police bullhorn.) The incident was on my street, in my block, and I'd like to share some of the story with you. We neighbors have learned a lot, and I’m sharing it here, in the hope that if the same thing happens on your street, you have some helpful tools and resources. [And a note that this reflects my opinion. It’s absolutely possible that some of my neighbors have somewhat different points of view.]

Resources below –
Whenever you see an asterisk in the text, search for the corresponding resource below the article.

A problem house –
One of our oldest and most long-time neighbors has been away from his home for a few years. In September 2015, his grandson moved in. Near the end of the year and early in 2016, we saw more and more traffic going in and out of the house. All races and all ages, from young adults to old men with grizzled beards, even an elderly gent with a cane.

Typical behavior would be that a car would park down the block or around the corner, the driver or a passenger would make a phone call, and a few minutes later, the car would move up to the house in question. Driver or passenger would go in, or someone would come out from the house. Big bags were carried to and from the house. Baggies were passed through car windows. People came and went at all hours of the day and night, in cars or on bicycles.

By now, several additional people appeared to be living there. We contacted the young man’s family, but they seemed helpless to do anything about the issue. Whenever a family member came to visit, the people from the house would be gone.

Neighbors – and police – respond
The police were really good about responding to our calls. In mid-February, a policeman familiar with the reports told a neighbor that, when we see this sort of activity, we should call the SPD narcotics unit at 206-684-5797. We had an officer assigned to us, and we were given an “event number,” to which we referred every time we called 9-1-1.

Gathering information
A neighbor requested (and paid $60 for) an in-depth background check* from the Washington State Patrol for the young man in the house. Turns out he had an extensive record a few years back, although he’d been clean until December, 2015, not long after he moved into the house on our block. Too bad for us.


Photo courtesy of Seattle Police
Department.
He shared the information about the young resident’s criminal record with our neighborhood Block Watch, and we began to exchange information about all the traffic, all the activity at the house, in email. With a lot of traffic and a lot of neighbors, email soon became cumbersome and confusing, so we began a log in a shared Google spreadsheet*. Here’s the info we asked for:

Neighbors entered information anonymously. We would occasionally download the spreadsheet, save it as an Excel doc, and email it to our police contacts.

Activity at the house escalated, and so did our calls. And police patrols did, too, I’m happy to say.

Considering options –
We discussed hiring a private investigator, and some of us did a bit of research. We talked with a couple of members of the Washington Association of Legal Investigators* who gave us good advice. But ultimately, we decided that our own surveillance was pretty good.

We attempted to engage the DEA, the Drug Enforcement Agency*, but our situation – while a big deal to us – is a bit below the level they’re dealing with, i.e., with gangs, smuggling, and enforcement at a higher level.

We considered surveillance cameras* but they are expensive and there are legal issues regarding videotaping activities around a private home, etc. Be careful, should you choose this route.

Sharing information with police
Working with our own notes, comments on Nextdoor*, and emails from neighbors, we put together some interesting connections for the police. Someone reported a blue mountain bike, stolen a block from the house, on Nextdoor. A neighbor saw that post and sent it around to our group, urging people to watch for such a bike at the house. And when a blue bike turned up there a few hours later, we called 9-1-1, again. (The lucky owner will soon be able to recover his bike!)

SPD goes in –
So on Monday night, April 18, the neighborhood was thrilled – and chilled – to hear the first concussion grenade, or “flash-bang,” right before midnight. It took more than an hour and a half for the SPD Major Crimes Task Force to get everybody out of the house. You can read the (mostly true) story here: http://spdblotter.seattle.gov/2016/04/19/detectives-recover-bikes-cars-and-motorcycle-after-investigation-at-wedgwood-home/ Several people were arrested. Some of the “residents” -- people of differing ages who were renting from the young owner, we presume – were allowed to go, after being identified. A lot of stolen property was found.

This part is good: No guns were found, as far as we heard.

And apparently no drugs were found, either – plenty of time to flush them, we were told. As we understand, it is considered a small-time operation. During the experience in our neighborhood, several people have mentioned the FrontLine* story that aired – what a coincidence! – in mid-February.

Where was the stolen property going?
One of the people arrested was selling things on Facebook in February 2015 and earlier. Craigslist and OfferUp* are also outlets, although we’re told that OfferUp eagerly cooperates with the police, in order to keep things on the up-and-up.

What’s happening in the house now?
With the help and advice of the police, the owners of the house have taken it back over, changed the locks, and put up No Trespassing signs. There’s still some activity – the word is not yet out everywhere that this house is no longer in business. But it’s a good start. (And that’s fortunate for the family, because if the situation had been allowed to go on too long without their intervention, they could have lost the house; it could have been “abated” as a “nuisance property.”*)

What are the next steps in the legal process?
As a neighborhood, our next steps are to make contact with the prosecuting attorney(s). We’ll follow the suspects who were arrested through the criminal justice system. Along the way, we’ll encourage the judges to deal with their crimes and punishment as seriously as possible. Prosecuting attorneys are generally eager for help from citizens who know a case intimately. (You can follow the process somewhat on VineLink.com*.)

Our same neighborhood was involved in a similar situation in 2000/2001. That involved 3 or 4 houses and nearly a dozen juveniles. Neighbors attended the court appearances of the major trouble-makers, putting pressure on attorneys and judges to put conditions on the kids, which made re-offenses less likely. We did it before – we can do it again.

Retribution?
For the record – for those of you who might fear retribution in such a situation – our police contacts assure us that these guys (and a few gals) aren’t likely to do that. They might be familiar with the individual police people and hold a grudge against them, but generally don’t have time or energy to remember and seek revenge on the neighbors.

What you can do:
1.    Pay attention to changes in your neighborhood, and act sooner rather than later.
2.    Keep an up-to-date list of all the residents in your neighborhood. (We have a shared Excel spreadsheet and update it at the “Night Out” event in August. It includes names, addresses, phone numbers, email addresses, etc. We also include pets’ names, as well as special skills that would be helpful in case of emergency: medical training, ham radio operators, survival skills, handymen, etc.)
3.     If you see something, say something: Call 9-1-1.

I'm happy to answer any questions. Take care, Everyone!

Ellen Blackstone


RESOURCES:


To request a background check, begin here: http://www.wsp.wa.gov/crime/chrequests.htm)

To set up a Google spreadsheet, start here:
https://www.google.com/sheets/about/)

Seattle Police Department phone numbers:
Non-emergency: 206-625-5011, then press 2, then press #, then 8
Narcotics unit: 206-684-5797

Washington Association of Legal Investigators: http://wali.org/

DEA, Drug Enforcement Agency http://www.dea.gov/about/mission.shtml

Info on video cameras: http://amazon.com/Uniden-G955-Wireless-Surveillance-Monitor/dp/B00FQJEJNY/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1461612669&sr=8-2&keywords=uniden+g955+camera
and amazon.com/Reconyx-HyperFire-HC500-Semi-Covert/dp/B003K29V2I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1461612892&sr=8-1&keywords=reconyx+trail+camera

Nextdoor - https://wedgwood.nextdoor.com/news_feed/

Jail Inmate Lookup Service
http://blue.kingcounty.gov/Courts/Detention/JILS/default.aspx

VineLink.com - “Victims have the right to know” - Allows you to sign up to be notified of next steps in a suspect’s legal process
https://vinelink.com/#/home

OfferUp https://offerupnow.com/
Has photos of stuff for sale, which might impede sales of stolen goods: http://bikeportland.org/2015/12/17/170450-170450

KCTS FrontLine, Chasing Heroin: http://kcts9.org/programs/frontline/episodes/3406

And more information here: http://kcts9.org/programs/chasing-heroin-in-seattle

Article in the  Seattle Times: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/chasing-heroin-examines-heroin-problem-in-seattle-nationwide/

Abatement of nuisance properties: Wikipedia has a good explanation and some examples of abatement of nuisance properties: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuisance_abatement (It’s happened before in Seattle, in dire situations, as you’ll see.)

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Funding plan for new North Precinct announced

In case you missed the press release from the Mayor's Office last week:

Mayor Ed Murray announced the funding strategy for the new Seattle Police Department North Precinct, slated to break ground in 2017 and open for business in 2019. The mayor will propose no new taxes to pay for the project.

“Because of our vibrant local economy and vigorous real estate sales, we can construct our new North Precinct within existing and projected resources,” said Murray. “While we do have other public safety infrastructure projects on the horizon, there is no need to send a public safety levy to the ballot in near future.”

Seattle continues to collect large receipts in the Real Estate Excise Tax (REET) from the sales of residential and commercial properties, which can only be used to pay for City capital projects, including transportation infrastructure, Parks buildings and public safety facilities. Due to projected ongoing strength of REET receipts, the mayor will not propose a public safety levy in 2016 or 2017.

To date, $21 million has been appropriated toward the $160 million precinct project, which will be located at Aurora Avenue North and North 130th Street. The mayor is proposing to fund the remaining $139 million through a combination of REET receipts, 30-year bonds financed by future REET receipts, and the one-time sale of other City assets.

The new North Precinct will accommodate future growth in the Seattle Police Department and replaces the existing North Precinct facility at 10049 College Way North, which is seriously over-crowded. Expansion at the current site is not possible and the existing building constructed in 1984 to house 154 staff, is now home to more than 250 personnel. Planning work began on this project in 2013.

In 2015, Seattle collected a record $73 million through REET on commercial and residential real estate transactions. The City projects that REET collections will continue to remain strong: $56 million in 2016, $56 million in 2017, $60 million in 2018 and $64 million in 2019. A portion of these revenues will be directed towards the construction of the new North Precinct facility.

“Public safety and community policing are high priorities for Seattle residents,” said Councilmember Debora Juarez. “A new police station will house more officers in a better location, which will help ensure police are available to residents when they call. Safe communities are healthy communities.  The proposed financing approach for this facility means we can make a significant investment in our community without asking voters for a new tax increase.”

“With the current North Precinct overcrowded and sitting on a swamp, a new precinct building cannot come soon enough,” said Councilmember Tim Burgess, chair of the Council’s finance committee. “The Council has long pushed to move this project forward as quickly as possible, and I’m pleased that Mayor Murray has developed a solid funding plan to advance construction.”

As part of the City’s effort to respond to homelessness, the City continues to partner with Mary’s Place to provide additional temporary shelter for homeless families within the old PI Bank building at 130th and Stone Way, which currently stands on the site of the new precinct.

One-Day Community Police Academy now available


Interested in the Seattle Police Department’s Community Police Academy (CPA) but can’t make the time commitment? SPD developed a One-Day Academy which is a hybrid of the regular eleven-week sessions. The One-Day Community Police Academy provides a brief overview of a number of classes given during the regular sessions. 

Date: Saturday, June 25, 2016
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Location: TBA
Cost: Free
Sponsored by: Seattle Police Department

Space is very limited (15 - 20) for the One-Day Academy and the class will fill quickly. All applicants must pass a records’ check. For information contact: Maggie Olsen (206) 684-8672  or margaret.olsen@seattle.gov

Saturday, April 2, 2016

NPAC meets Wednesday, April 6

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, April 6, 2016
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle College
Room CC1161, College Center Building

Guest speaker: Brian Maxey, SPD Chief Operating Officer, will discuss the recently-released SPD staffing study report.

All NPAC meetings are open to the public. Everyone is welcome!

Thursday, March 17, 2016

SPD's role in heroin crisis featured in recent Frontline report



Frontline's recent report, "Chasing Heroin", includes a section on Seattle's Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program. LEAD allows law enforcement officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drug or prostitution activity to community-based services, instead of jail and prosecution. By diverting eligible individuals to services, LEAD improves public safety and reduces criminal behaviors of people who participate in the program.

Monday, February 29, 2016

NPAC meets Wednesday

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, March 2, 2016
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle Community College
College Center Building, Room CC1161

Guest speaker: Chief Harold Scoggins, Seattle Fire Department

The full agenda may be viewed here.

NPAC meetings are open to all community members. Please join us!

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

NPAC provides community members with information about cleaning up discarded needles

Last Saturday, NPAC's Social Services Committee hosted a training about how to remove needles from public places as safely as possible.

KUOW's Bill Radke interviewed NPAC's Mike Cuadra, the primary organizer of the training: See A Used Heroin Needle? Seattle Residents Learn To Pick Them Up Safely.

Joe Tinsley from the King County Needle Exchange Program provided participants with information on how to pick up and dispose of needles in as safe a manner as possible.

NPAC Executive Board Member Mike Cuadra handed out sharps containers and trash pickers. The University Masonic Lodge donated materials as well as the space for the training.

Community members practiced using trash pickers to gather needles and discard them in sharps containers.
Additional media coverage:

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Mayor plans to hire more police officers

During his State of the City 2016 address yesterday, Mayor Ed Murray announced a plan to hire an additional 200 police officers by 2019. In September 2015, the NPAC Executive Board sent a letter to Seattle City Council members asking them to hire more officers than the 25 originally proposed in the city budget. Here is an excerpt:

We are happy to see explicitly stated in the proposed budget, “Greater visibility of police officers in Seattle neighborhoods and downtown is a priority for the Mayor and the chief of police, and as a first step, the department is reallocating resources to put more officers on the streets.” 

However, adding 25 officers in 2016 and phasing in 100 officers over four years is simply not enough to keep up with the needs of our city.  Communities and SPD can only build a strong and trusting relationship when we are able to interact beyond the crisis situations that prompt 911 calls.  The most effective way to have citizens and officers interact is to have officers out in our community. 

Current staffing levels simply don’t allow for enough officers to be in our neighborhoods on foot and bike patrols on a regular basis.  The Community Police Team is doing great work and more CPT Officers would go a long way in continuing to build a positive relationship with Seattleites. Adding officers would increase police presence and decrease crime in our city.  The money spent in adding officers would be saved as crime decreases city wide.

For these reasons the North Precinct Advisory Council advocates for targeting the addition of 150 new officers to the budget for 2016.

Monday, February 8, 2016

Speakers provide NPAC members with overview of response to homelessness in Seattle

Each NPAC meeting starts with guest speakers who provide information related to public safety, law enforcement, or other topic of interest to members. Over the last year, NPAC members have been expressing increasing concerns about homelessness in their communities including long-term parking among people who are living in their motor vehicles. During the February NPAC meeting, guest speakers provided information about the homelessness state of emergency declared by Mayor Murray and King County Executive Constantine and briefly discussed what community members can do to advocate for solutions.

Meeting minutes provide an summary of the information shared by Alison Eisinger from the King County Coalition on Homelessness and Catherine Lester from the Seattle Human Services Department. Later in the week, the City Council Human Services and Public Health Committee was briefed about the state of emergency. The briefing may be viewed online

Sunday, January 31, 2016

NPAC meets Wednesday

North Precinct Advisory Council Meeting
Wednesday, February 3, 2016
7-8:30 p.m.
North Seattle Community College
Room CC1161, College Center Building

Guest speakers: Catherine Lester from the City of Seattle Human Services Department and Alison Eisinger from the Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness who will talk about the homelessness state of emergency and what communities can do to advocate for the reduction of homelessness. Mayor Murray recently gave a speech about homelessness and it may be read here.

All NPAC meetings are open to the public.

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

February 20: Learn how to safely clean up discarded syringes in public places


North Precinct Advisory Council
Social Services Committee

invites community members to a free training

How to Safely Remove Used Syringes from a Public Area

Saturday, February 20
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
University Masonic Lodge
4338 University Way NE

 
A representative from Seattle-King County Public Health's needle exchange program will talk about the risks, proper handling, and disposal of used needles. A limited number of sharps containers and garbage pickers will be available for participants. For more information and to RSVP, contact NPAC Social Services Committee volunteer Michael Cuadra.

Why: Methamphetamine (meth) and heroin are the most common drugs confiscated by police during north Seattle drug enforcement activities and are the most common reason people in King County call the Recovery Help Line. Heroin and meth-related deaths in King County have risen sharply since 2013 as have heroin-related admissions to substance abuse treatment programs.[1] One way this increase in heroin and meth abuse and addiction is showing up in our communities is as an increase in used and discarded needles in public places.  

This free training will provide community members who regularly see discarded needles in public places with the information they need to safely dispose of them. While certainly not a solution for preventing and reducing drug abuse, the training can provide neighbors with information needed to keep public areas clean and safe. Other resources: 

Needles in parks: Call the Seattle Parks Department Maintenance Request Line: 206-684-7250.

Needles on other city-owned land/facilities: During regular business hours, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., call the SPU Illegal Dumping Hotline: 206-684-7587.

[1] More information at the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute: http://adai.uw.edu/pubs/

Monday, January 25, 2016

Community Police Academy accepting applications


The Seattle Police Department is now accepting applications for the 2016 Spring SPD Community Police Academy (CPA).  The Academy will start on Thursday, March 17th and will meet once a week for eleven consecutive Thursday evenings, 5:30 – 9:30 pm, ending on Thursday, May 26th.   Participation is free.  

The Community Police Academy is an eleven-week program designed to educate community members about the operations of the Seattle Police Department, while also giving the Department an opportunity to obtain valuable feedback from the community. The purpose of the Community Police Academy is to increase understanding between the Seattle Police Department and the community members of Seattle through education and interaction.

Community participants will become familiar with various facets of the Seattle Police Department and gain insight into law enforcement's role in the criminal justice system and the daily work of police employees. With increased understanding, Seattle's community and police can work together and achieve realistic solutions to neighborhood problems relating to crime, fear of crime, and neighborhood decay. It is hoped that increasing community awareness will respond to some of the myths and images of law enforcement and provide a realistic view of police procedures.

If you are interested in applying, please visit: http://www.cityofseattle.net/police/programs/policeacademy/default.htm   When filling out the application please include a copy of your Driver’s License.  Space is limited and applications are processed on a first come, first serve basis.  The application deadline is Friday, February 5, 2016.  If you have any questions, please contact Maggie Olsen at (206) 684-8672 or by e-mail margaret.olsen@seattle.gov